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Issue 271

15:44 10th March 2011 by Duncan Slater
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BOARDS 271

BOARDS 271

contents 271 / MARCH 2011 / Covershot: Robby Swift at Jaws by Darryl Wong

features

MINI TEST 1

Word on the beach is that Steve Thorp has been working the plastic fantastic and quietly taking the world by storm with his cost effective answer to G10 wave fins. Time to send in our super sleuth, Adrian Jones, to track him down and find out more…

GUYS ON TOUR – VICTOR FERNANDEZ

Acting on reports that the recently crowned World Wave Champ had been spotted among the large flock of migratory pros overwintering on Cape Town’s prime feeding grounds, Phil Horrocks winged his way down for a chat…

100L FREESTYLE BOARDS

Still convinced that freestyle boards are designed purely for hyperactive rubber-limbed kids with gyroscopic balancing skills? Then read on as Adrian Jones, ably assisted as ever by the Clones, brings us up to date…

ROAMIN’ RHODES

Taking a short break from his ELK shooting tour of the UK, Dave White heads out to the Dodecanese archipelago’s biggest island to explore the windsurfing potential…

INTERNED IN THE LOFT

Windsurfing internships are tough to come by… Or are they? Harmen Bakker reveals how a simple but effective four-step plan resulted in him spending a fruitful five months at a well-known sail loft… 

MINI TEST 2

Our esteemed editor discovers that working for a windsurfing mag isn’t all sweetness and light; occasionally you have to confront your fears, face the elephant in the room, and let the cat out of the bag…

BETWEEN CANCER AND SECOND LIFE

Axel Reese catches up with freestyle sensation and film producer Andre Paskowski to find out how his post operative rehab’s going, and talk about his plans for the future…

MR & MRS WINDSURFING

If there was a competition to find the perfect windsurfing couple, then we’d say that this month’s ‘Have Your Say’ participants, Mark and Jackie Lambert, would probably walk away with it… 

HANGING A LEFT AT JAWS

Not another Jaws picture spread? Pleeeaase… But listen up – it’s our Swifty, and the boy has a different angle on the place…

regulars

DROPPING IN

PICTURE DESK

NEWS

Sims o’Clock

Fuller’s Way

SB WINDWISE

WANNABE A WAVESAILOR

BAKER ACADEMY

READERS’ PIX

NEXT ISSUE

CLOSE OUT

+++ ADDENDUM +++

Unfortunately a printing error has led to a glitch on p126 of this issue and the omission of a few lines of text. Dave White: Jaw dropping mistaken celebration. It’s not so much I want to celebrate a mistake but having been told at school I’m likely to bring a long list of them, I feel quite honoured to be highlighting the second in my time at BOARDS. File corruption or printer error for me isn’t the issue, it’s the content that went missing I’d rather draw your attention to. Sure, you’ll still find Robby Swift sailing Jaws within the pages of BOARDS when it drops through your door, but in a rather left field approach to the sneak peek, here’s p126 in its full and unadulterated glory.”

BOARDS 271, p126

BOARDS 271, p126

  1. Duncan

    So, we have twist, which allows wind to be spilled and is effectively the sail’s exhaust, and we have the ‘triangle of action’, which helps us understand the way the sail releases and dumps drag. Of course, there is significantly more to sail design than this, but I want to take these two concepts and make us begin thinking about how we rig our sails for certain situations.

  2. Duncan

    fortunately josh, that's a subscriber copy, which we keep clear of coverlines as it doesn't need to be sold off the shelf and allows you to see the covershot in all of its glory.

    but unhappily matt, you're quite right (and i can't print our initial response, sorry it took so long to respond here!) there has been one hell of an omission in the ant baker slalom secrets this issue. here's the errant copy:

    Wider luff tubes in race sails create a bigger draft, a more stable airflow, and more drive. Slimmer luff tubes create a less stable airflow, more forgiving drive and a lighter feel. It’s why camber induced wave sails never prospered – or at least not anywhere other than the Gorge in Columbia, where nuclear winds and giant gusts mean that a sail which holds its shape is vital.

    The draft creates power, and this power is translated into something approximating downforce. Like a Formula 1 car, when powered up the sail creates drive, and a by-product of this is downforce. This can be witnessed when you sheet out at pace; the nose rises and the board becomes skittish, a little like removing a wing or spoiler from the car. It is in these terms that we increasingly need to understand how to rig our sail.

    Okay, so if we understand the Triangle of Action and the way in which the cloth outside of this area aids airflow, what is twist?

    Twist

    Twist is different from airflow in so far as it is controlled by mast reflex and sail design. What do I mean? Well, when you see a saggy leech on a sail, it’s saggy because of the sail’s relationship to downhaul/outhaul tension and mast bend, which reduces the length between the head and the clew, leaving more cloth than can be accommodated tightly.

    Therefore, when you sail the saggy cloth is stretched out by airflow, and as that airflow increases it encourages mast reflex or bend, so initiates the sail to twist away and dump power. It does not dump drag, it dumps power – excess power that the sail cannot handle. The more carbon in the mast the quicker it will return to its original shape, and therefore the less the sailor notices twist, but perversely the greater benefit he or she will derive from it.

  3. josh Sparks

    so how come the copy of this magazine i got had no writing on the front cover except the title?

  4. Matt

    Is there another omission between the bottom of page 97 and top of page 98 – Ant's article? Seems there is something missing there as well…

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