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Wannabe a Wavesailor with Jem Hall: Letting Go – Completely!

00:36 17th August 2011 by Duncan Slater
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Jem lets go...

Jem lets go...

In this instalment of his comprehensive series examining every aspect of wavesailing, Jem Hall rounds his hands-free trilogy off with a no-handed jump.

Word on the street is that some of you found the one-handed rotational mayhem of the last few months somewhat overwhelming. That’s entirely understandable, but it’s cool as my schedule for Wannabe is always (and has to be) flexible, so before we get all nose-first let’s ease up a bit and look at the no-handed jump. I’ll also do a recap on one-handers, as both of these jumps are well within your grasp.

As I was planning this piece I thought about where my motivation for all these hands-free shenanigans came from, and was reintroduced via the web to some great old-school clips of Polakow doing huge one-handed moves at Ho’okipa. Thus was born my early inspiration, which in turn I have hopefully passed on to you. The hands-free jumps not only have form and grace – they also have function in that they get you, the rig and board in the right place at the right time (otherwise you will eat some shit). You can also suck it and see, from a quick flash to being as free as a bird throughout the entire move.

I have already asked you to release the handbrake and sail with passion. Now, if you have passion and are committed to wavesailing then you should therefore love your wavesailing, but “In order to love you have to let go of fear” (Gerald G. Jampolsky). Remember all these motivational talks are to inspire you. This wavesailing lark requires so many qualities, and inspiration is a big part of it all – as is perspiration!

Who? Once you can jump and control the board in flight and on landing, you’re ready to drop your front hand and (eventually) both hands. It’s like carve gybing – once you’re up to 50% consistency and are fluid, get into some duck gybes. Yep – if you don’t go you won’t know!

Why? Dropping one or two hands makes you drop your hips to commit to your lines and control the rig. This low-hipped position gets the rig back, thereby flying you, and positions you to lift the tail and push the nose off. And it looks and feels so greeeeattt!

What? The no-hander is a jump with a release and drop of both hands while you’re in flight. Try not to swat any flies or perform disco moves.

Where? Off ample sized chop and small to medium but not too steep waves, and in cross to cross-slightly-on winds. You should aim to go for a long rather than a steep jump.

When? Get off the water and drop those hands pretty sharpish, as you haven’t got too much time to admire the view. Your first attempts should be a quick throw down of the hands and then back on for touchdown.

How? Let’s look at the dynamics of this funky move now.

Click here to read Jem’s Wannabe 252 article in full…

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